Reference > Cooking Methods & Techniques > Cooking Sirups

Cooking Sirups

Sugar and water are boiled to different degrees of temperature for making different kinds of candy. The thicker the sirup, the higher the temperature. Tests for sirups of different consistencies are:

Thread

When dropped from a spoon, the sirup forms a thread about two inches long (230 degrees F.).

Soft Ball

When dropped into cold water, the sirup forms a soft ball if rolled between the fingers (236 degrees F.).

Hard Ball

When dropped into cold water, the sirup forms a firm ball (252 degrees F.).

Crack

When dropped into cold water, the sirup becomes brittle (270 degrees F.).

Hard Crack

When dropped into cold water, the sirup becomes very hard and brittle (293 degrees F.).

Caramel

When sugar (without addition of water) liquefies when hot and becomes very hard and brittle when cold (310 degrees F.).

Source

School and Home Cooking (1920).

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