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Utensils

The following is a list of utensils with which a kitchen should be furnished. But the housekeeper will find that there is continually something new to be bought. If there be much fancy cooking, there must be an ice cream freezer, jelly and charlotte russe moulds and many little pans and cutters. The right way is, of course, to get the essential articles first, and then, from time to time, to add those used in fancy cooking:

  • 2 cast-iron pots, size depending upon range or stove (they come with the stove).
  • 1 griddle.
  • 1 porcelain-lined preserving kettle.
  • 1 fish kettle.
  • 3 porcelain-lined stew-pans, holding from one to six quarts.
  • 1 No. 4 deep Scotch frying kettle.
  • 1 waffle iron.
  • 3 French polished frying-pans, Nos. 1, 3 and 6.
  • 4 stamped tin or granite ware stewpans, holding from one pint to four quarts.
  • 1 double boiler, holding three quarts.
  • 1 Dover egg-beater.
  • 1 common wire beater.
  • 1 meat rack.
  • 1 dish pan.
  • 2 bread pans, holding six and eight quarts respectively.
  • 2 milk pans.
  • 2 Russian-iron baking pans, two sizes.
  • 4 tin shallow baking-pans.
  • 4 deep pans for loaves.
  • 2 quart measures.
  • 1 deep, round pan of granite-ware, with cover, for braising.
  • 1 deep Russian-iron French roll pan.
  • 2 stamped tin muffin pans.
  • 1 tea-pot.
  • 1 coffee-pot.
  • 1 coffee biggin.
  • 1 chocolate pot.
  • 1 colander.
  • 1 squash strainer.
  • 1 strainer that will fit on to one of the cast-iron pots.
  • 1 frying-basket.
  • 1 melon mould.
  • 2 brown bread tins.
  • 1 round pudding mould.
  • 2 vegetable cutters.
  • 1 tea canister.
  • 1 coffee canister.
  • 1 cake box.
  • 1 spice box.
  • 1 dredger for flour.
  • 1 for powdered sugar.
  • 1 smaller dredger for salt.
  • 1 still smaller, for pepper.
  • 1 boning knife.
  • 1 French cook's knife.
  • 1 large fork.
  • 2 case-knives and forks.
  • 2 vegetable knives.
  • 4 large mixing spoons.
  • 2 table-spoons.
  • 6 teaspoons.
  • 1 larding needle.
  • 1 trussing needle.
  • 1 set of steel skewers.
  • 1 wire dish cloth.
  • 1 whip churn.
  • 1 biscuit cutter.
  • 1 hand basin.
  • 1 jagging iron.
  • 3 double broilers, one each for toast, fish and meat.
  • 1 long-handled dipper.
  • 1 large grater.
  • 1 apple corer.
  • 1 flour scoop.
  • 1 sugar scoop.
  • 1 lemon squeezer.
  • chopping tray and knife.
  • small wooden bowl to use in chopping.
  • moulding board of good hard wood.
  • board for cutting-bread on.
  • 1 for cutting cold meats on.
  • thick board, or block, on which to break bones, open lobsters, etc.
  • rolling pin.
  • wooden buckets for sugar, Graham, Indian and rye meal.
  • wooden boxes for rice, tapioca, crackers, barley, soda, cream of tartar, etc.
  • covers for flour barrels.
  • wire flour sieve--not too large.
  • pail for cleaning purposes.
  • 1 vegetable masher.
  • stone pot for bread, holding ten quarts.
  • 1 for butter, holding six quarts.
  • 1 for pork, holding three quarts.
  • 1 dust pan and brush.
  • 1 scrubbing brush.
  • 1 broom.
  • 1 blacking brush.
  • 4 yellow earthen bowls, holding from six quarts down.
  • 4 white, smooth-bottomed bowls, holding one quart each.
  • 1 bean pot.
  • 1 earthen pudding dish.

All the tin ware should be made from xx tin. It will then keep its shape, and wear three times as long as if made of thin stuff. Scouring with sand soon ruins tin, the coarse sand scratching it and causing it to rust. Sapolio, a soap which comes for cleaning tins, wood-work and paint, will be found of great value in the kitchen.

Granite ware, as now made, is perfectly safe to-use. It will not become discolored by any kind of cooking, and is so perfectly smooth that articles of food will not stick and bum in it as quickly as in the porcelain-lined pans. Nearly every utensil used in the kitchen is now made in granite ware. The mixing spoons are, however, not desirable, as the coating of granite peels off when the spoon is bent. Have no more heavy cast-iron articles than are really needed, for they are not easily handled, and are, therefore, less likely to be kept as clean, inside and out, as the lighter and smoother ware.

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Source

Miss Parloa's New Cook Book.


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