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Weights and Measures

We recommend to all families that they should keep in the house: a pair of scales, (one of the scales deep enough to hold flour, sugar, etc., conveniently,) and a set of tin measures: as accuracy in proportioning the ingredients is indispensable to success in cookery. It is best to have the scales permanently fixed to a small beam projecting (for instance) from one of the shelves of the store-room. This will preclude the frequent inconvenience of their getting twisted, unlinked, and otherwise out of order; a common consequence of putting them in and out of their box, and carrying them from place to place. The weights (of which there should be a set from two pounds to a quarter of an ounce) ought carefully to be kept in the box, that none of them may be lost or mislaid.

A set of tin measures (with small spouts or lips) from a gallon down to half a jill, will be found very convenient in every kitchen; though common pitchers, bowls, glasses, etc. may be substituted. It is also well to have a set of wooden measures from a bushel to a quarter of a peck.

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Source

Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches (1840).


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